A Compelling City on Water Filled with Staggering Human Misery

Splendidly spoiler free review.

Blackfish City is an extraordinary piece of fiction. Sam J. Miller is able to build a world, immerse readers in it, and make them marvel at its strangeness and decaying grandeur. The mysteries that surround the water city of Qaanaaq — its history, technological wonders, and status as the envy of the Sunken World nations — set a riveting stage for the book’s cast of deeply scarred and fascinating characters. The narrative itself is expertly paced and written, giving each character a depth that makes you almost feel their anguish and understand the desperation of their lives in Qaanaaq.

The social and political subtext that is a hallmark of every great piece of speculative fiction is abundant in Blackfish City and often made me think of contemporary parallels without ever beating me over the head with an agenda. It opened my eyes to broader perspectives about different lifestyles, the fallibility of human systems, and the absolute corruption of the soul when survival becomes the only goal.

This book tries to deliver the entire package in a single tale – authentic world, fully-realized characters, compelling narrative, social commentary, unique fantastical elements – and I think in large part it succeeds. I appreciate immensely an author being able to bring a story to life within a single novel and deliver on all these elements. It’s a testament to being able to enthrall readers and give them a story that stays with them, moves them in some way, and becomes a meaningful part of their love of the genre without them having to commit to a ten-book series. *cough* Game of Thrones *cough*

Qaanaaq is a scary place, and it echos the dead nations that preceded it in many insidious ways that aren’t immediately apparent. The squalor and social divides are all the proof that’s needed that the computer programs that run the city are no better than their human programmers. It was absolutely chilling to think that the most ruthless of the old world could rule the new one and use anonymity and hide behind the so-called benevolent computer programs to keep a stranglehold on what was left of the world’s wealth.

Qaanaaq is seen as a successful model forward as the world floods or burns, but those who make it to the floating city find only temporary relief. There is barely enough space for the population, many residents crammed in closet- and box-sized living spaces. A deadly disease the breaks, is sweeping the population and a phantom of the old world, bent on vengeance for the genocide of her people, has arrived.

My favorite parts? Slight spoilers start now…

I was a big fan of Ankit and Kaev. They are both tragic characters, but survivors. Miller isn’t afraid to shatter his characters and it was devastating to see how short lived some of their happiness was. Joy has been in short supply their whole lives and I had a hard time when I realized that part of their tale would not end well.

There is so much sorrow in this book, and Ora and Masaaraq represent the core of this. Their story is arguably the center of the narrative, and they are determined to persevere no matter what. They are symbolic of an older generation under siege but with the strength to help those who come after them. They could represent the philosophy of yin and yang, one fiercely loyal to blood family, the other committed to the human race achieving more harmony.

To get a quick take on all of the book’s main characters, check out my data visualization. It shows the order characters were introduced in the book and a ranking of my favorites. For those who want spoilers, hover on the dots to see some of my analysis of each character. DON’T hover on the dots if you don’t want want spoilers!

4 out of 5 stars (I wish the third act hadn’t been so rushed.)

Happy Reading,

Josh

Blackfish City

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